a tale of two (boxes of) teddies

imagination of peace

Last year I received an email from an Elder of Dunfermline Abbey (which is one of my partner churches back in Scotland) informing me that one of their upcoming Labour of Love knitting projects was to be Teddies for Tragedies. The teddy bears are made to a simple knitted pattern, all the same size, and are often sent to children in hospitals, schools, or orphanages in areas of conflict or extreme poverty. She asked if any of our partner organisations might be interested. Just a few months earlier, I had taken a bag of similar bears to the EMMS hospital in Nazareth to sell in their shop and distribute to the children around the holidays, so I wanted to find other homes for these little bears. ‘I’ll try to get them into Gaza,’ I wrote back.

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On 4 February, two boxes of teddies were blessed in Sunday worship at Dunfermline…

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“Abide in me” – a sermon for Easter 5

... because God is love

“Abide in me” says Jesus, “as I abide in you.” And he uses this striking image of the vine and its branches.

What does it mean to abide in Jesus?

‘Abide’ is an interesting word. It’s not just about being friends with Jesus, or spending time with him. It’s something deeper, more rooted and grounded, more intimate than that. The branches of the vine are not just close it, they are part of it, just as we are part of the body of Christ.

And what does it mean to abide in the risen Jesus?

“We are an Easter people and alleluia is our song.”

What does it mean to abide in Easter, to dwell in the resurrection, to know ourselves to be part of the risen Christ? One of the things I think being an Easter people must mean is that we make ‘alleluia’ our song in all things…

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Lecture Five: Slavishness, Democracy, and the Death of God

Very meaty! Not for vegans!

Gifford Lectures Blog

Professor Stout delivered the fifth of his Gifford Lectures last night. My summary  is below. The video of Stout’s lecture is embedded below for those who were unable to attend in person, or for those who’d like to listen to it again. An audio only version can be  found at the end of this post. In order to further facilitate discussion Professor David Fergusson will be adding his initial reflections on Professor Stout’s fifth lecture. Fergusson is Professor of Divinity and Principal of New College at the University of Edinburgh and he himself is also a former Gifford Lecturer. We’d like to reiterate that we warmly welcome anyone wishing to engage with Stout’s lectures to contribute their comments and questions below.

Professor Stout begins his fifth lecture by speaking of Nietzche’s eclipse of Emerson. Emerson spoke of many of the same themes that Nietzsche did before Nietzsche did, but…

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